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February 20, 2018
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Lindsey Vonn took home a bronze medal Wednesday in Pyeongchang, coming in behind Italy's Sofia Goggia and Norway's Ragnhild Mowinckel in the downhill race.

Vonn finished in 1:39.69, 0.47 seconds behind Goggia. "I skied a great race today," Vonn told NBC. "Sofia just skied better than I did." Vonn said she had "no regrets" about the event, but it was "tough to contemplate this being my last Olympic downhill race. I struggled to keep the emotions together. But I'm proud of my performance."

Vonn has competed in four Winter Olympics and won three medals. She won the gold in the downhill race at the 2010 Games in Vancouver, but a knee injury prevented her from participating in the 2014 Games in Sochi. She has one more individual event coming up: the combined on Thursday. Vonn told NBC she's "99.9 percent sure" she won't compete in the 2022 Games in Beijing, "but who knows? Maybe something will come out and they'll fix my knee up and I'll be like Robo-knee and I'll ski for like 10 more years. That'd be ideal." Catherine Garcia

6:47 a.m. ET

When you're giving a speech, a joke can help win over your audience and add leavening to a weighty subject. Sometimes those jokes don't age well, though, like pretty much any joke involving a racial epithet. Or jokes about your high school's lifelong code of omertà when, a few years later, you're a Supreme Court nominee credibly accused of a violent and clumsy attempted rape in high school and your high school friend, the only witness to the alleged incident, says he has no memory of it happening.

On Tuesday, CNN unearthed a video of Judge Brett Kavanaugh making such a joke. "Fortunately we had a good saying we've held firm to to this day," Kavanaugh said in a March 2015 speech at Catholic University of America's Columbus Law School: "What happens at Georgetown Prep stays at Georgetown Prep. That's been a good thing for all of us, I think." The joke is in the first part of the clip, and CNN's panel discusses it and the broader Kavanaugh imbroglio for a few minutes after that. Watch below. Peter Weber

6:12 a.m. ET
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On Tuesday, the Senate overwhelmingly passed a massive spending bill that funds the Defense Department and the Labor, Education, and Health and Human Services Departments for fiscal 2019 and also keeps the entire government open through Dec. 7, averting a government shutdown before the midterm elections. The House is expected to take up the measure next week, but because it does not include the money President Trump wants for his border wall, it is unclear if Trump will sign it. The government will partially shut down on Oct. 1 if Trump doesn't sign a stopgap spending bill.

The legislation the Senate passed 93 to 7 provides $606.5 billion for the Pentagon and $178 billion for Labor, Education, and HHS. Together, that accounts for more than 60 percent of discretionary spending. If the House approves and Trump signs the bill, Congress can wait to pass the seven remaining spending bills — out of 12 — by Dec. 7. Along with its stopgap spending measure, the Senate's Defense, Labor, Education, and HHS bill reauthorizes the Violence Against Women Act until Dec. 7 and orders the Department of Homeland Security to submit a plan to Congress to reunited separated migrant families. Peter Weber

4:57 a.m. ET

In her new book, Stormy Daniels writes about her night with President Trump "in detail," Jimmy Fallon said on Tuesday's Tonight Show, pulling a face, "which explains why every book comes with a bottle of Pepto-Bismol and a straw." He came up with creative ways to dance around Daniels' description of the president's "Trump Tower." Because of her comparison of Trump's "Don Jr." to a popular video game character, "in the new Mario Kart, Toad collects gold coins and uses them as hush money," Fallon joked. He spliced together a clip of Trump "setting the record straight" on the matter.

Fallon then involved the studio audience in a game centered around Trump's slurred mispronunciation of certain words, joked about the Emmys proposal and Amazon's big plans for Alexa, and showed a viral video about a gender-reveal ceremony gone awry. Watch below. Peter Weber

4:20 a.m. ET

"While there have been a number of tell-alls about [President] Trump," Jimmy Kimmel said on Tuesday's Kimmel Live, the new memoir from porn actress Stormy Daniels "is the first one that presents a detailed analysis of the president's genitalia." He read the entire description, which is as safe for work as network TV allows. "And just like that, I will never eat a mushroom or play a video game again," Kimmel joked. Daniels also said that Hillary Clinton called Trump while they were together during the 2008 Democratic primary, and they discussed some mysterious "plan."

Mid-joke, Tracy Morgan came out dressed in a suit and sporting Trump hair, an orange face, and tiny orange hands. He introduced himself as LaDonald Trump. "Tracy, what is this?" Kimmel asked. "What are you doing?" "This is a hilarious new character I created, just go with it," he said. They bantered about LaDonald's wife, first lady Mesothelioma, and his vice president, Mike Pence.

"I have to go, my nipples are getting itchy from the orange paint," Morgan said. "You know, I told you you didn't need to paint your whole body," Kimmel interjected. "I painted my whole body because I care about my craft," Morgan said, taking a little jab at his former 30 Rock co-star, now SNL's Trump impersonator: "Suck it, Alec Baldwin." He ambled over to the curtain hiding Emmy winner Glenn Weiss and his new fiancée, Jan Friedlander Svendsen, and crawled in bed with them.

Earlier in the show, Kimmel had interviewed the happy couple about Weiss' marriage proposal during Monday night's Emmys ceremony. You can watch that below. Peter Weber

3:36 a.m. ET
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On Tuesday, the Supreme Court allowed a lower-court ruling to take effect that will require nonprofit advocacy groups to disclose the names of political donors at least through the 2018 midterm elections, handing a win to campaign finance reformers and a loss to Crossroads GPS and other nonprofits that specialize in using secret "dark money" donations to influence political campaigns.

Last month, Chief U.S. District Judge Beryl Howell in Washington, D.C., had sided with Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) against Crossroads GPS, an influential conservative group, and threw out a decades-old Federal Elections Commission (FEC) rule shielding donors to political nonprofits. With the Supreme Court denying Crossroads GPS's request for a stay, "we're about to know a lot more about who is funding our elections," said CREW executive director Noah Bookbinder.

"With less than 50 days before this fall's congressional elections, the ruling has far-reaching consequences that could curtail the ability of major political players to raise money and force the disclosure of some of the country's wealthiest donors," The Washington Post reports. "The change could affect heavyweight groups across the political spectrum, including the Koch-backed Americans for Prosperity on the right and the League of Conservation Voters on the left." Conservatives were the ones complaining on Tuesday, characterizing Howell's ruling as an ill-timed incursion on free speech.

Starting Wednesday, the nonprofit advocacy groups will have to release the names of donors who contribute more than $200 annually for the purpose of influencing a federal election. Crossroads GPS will likely appeal the ruling, and the FEC will write a new rule for nonprofits, but neither of those will be in effect before the 2018 elections. The Supreme Court said Chief Justice John Roberts had referred the request for a stay to the court, which is divided 4-4 along ideological lines. The statement did not elaborate. You can read more at The Washington Post. Peter Weber

2:03 a.m. ET
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In the middle of a busy Washington, D.C., neighborhood, a garden is growing.

The GroW Garden was launched by George Washington University students in 2009, and in recent years, most of the produce has been donated to Miriam's Kitchen, an organization that aims to end homelessness. Depending on the time of year, the garden is overflowing with tomatoes, zucchini, squash, Swiss chard, and various herbs. Every week, a vegetable delivery — sometimes as much as 40 pounds — is brought straight from the garden to Miriam's Kitchen, where the produce is then given to people living in permanent supportive housing. The rest is prepared for homeless people who eat at a nearby church.

Recently, the students switched things up and started growing vegetables based on what Miriam's Kitchen specifically needs. Anything that doesn't go to Miriam's Kitchen is donated to George Washington University's on-campus food pantry. Senior Isabelle Moody told WTOP-FM the garden helps students understand the issue of food insecurity and "think about what exists beyond GW's bubble." The garden is "really special," senior Elizabeth Ferrante added, due to the way "that it connects people." Catherine Garcia

1:59 a.m. ET
AP Photo/Susan Walsh

As President Trump was leaving a Sept. 12 Congressional Medal of Honor Society event in the White House, Epoch Times photojournalist Samira Bouaou broke protocol by entering a restricted area and handing Trump a purple folder. "Trump accepted the folder and appeared to open it briefly as he departed before quickly shutting it," The Washington Post reported Tuesday, citing several news photographers who witnessed the event. "It was not clear what was inside the folder. Photographers who asked Bouaou afterward why she did it and what the folder contained said she declined to provide details."

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders has discussed Bouaou's folder situation with the White House Correspondents' Association executive board, and the White House has reviewed the incident, but nobody will say anything about it on the record. One White House official told the Post that the matter has been "dealt with." Bouaou, who had recently received a Secret Service pass to attend White House briefings and other events, has not been seen at the White House since the encounter, other photographers say.

The Epoch Times, launched in New York in 2000 by a group of Chinese Americans, is believed to have close ties to the Falun Gong spiritual group, an affiliation the newspaper denies. Falun Gong and the Epoch Times are both banned in China. Ming Xia, a political science professor at the Graduate Center at the City University of New York, tells the Post that the newspaper's part-time journalists "support the Falun Gong because they are Falun Gong practitioners. ... They are not professional journalists and they do not follow the protocols professional journalists abide by. That's how they can be very pushy and aggressive." Xia said the Falun Gong is eager to exploit Trump's hardline stance on Beijing. Peter Weber

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