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February 15, 2019

The NFL and former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick announced Friday that they have reached a settlement over Kaepernick's collusion lawsuit, The Washington Post reports. Kaepernick had sued the league after he was apparently blacklisted from playing football due to his protests during the national anthem; he has been out of the sport for the past two seasons.

While the terms of the settlement were not revealed, and the resolution is subject to a confidentiality agreement, NFL columnist Mike Freeman reported that "team officials are speculating to me [that] the NFL paid Kaepernick in the $60 million to $80 million range."

Separately, a similar lawsuit against the NFL by Carolina Panthers safety Eric Reid also reached a settlement. In a joint statement, the NFL and lawyers for Reid and Kaepernick said: "For the past several months, counsel for Mr. Kaepernick and Mr. Reid have engaged in an ongoing dialogue with representatives of the NFL ... The resolution of this matter is subject to a confidentiality agreement so there will be no further comment by any party."

The NFL Players Association also released a statement: "We are not privy to the details of the settlement, but support the decision by the players and their counsel," it read. "We continuously supported Colin and Eric from the start of their protests, participated with their lawyers throughout their legal proceedings, and were prepared to participate in the upcoming trial in pursuit of both truth and justice for what we believe the NFL and its clubs did to them. We are glad that Eric has earned a job and a new contract, and we continue to hope that Colin gets his opportunity as well." Jeva Lange

10:20 p.m.

Mohammad Yusuf Ibrahim, a politically-connected millionaire spice trader, has been detained in connection with the coordinated suicide bombings that killed more than 350 people on Easter Sunday, Indian officials told The New York Times.

Indian media reports that two of his sons were among the eight suicide bombers, and during a raid at his villa near the Sri Lankan capital Colombo on Sunday, a female suspect detonated a suicide vest, killing herself, two of her children, and several police officers. Ibrahim is now being interrogated by police, investigators said.

The Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the attacks, but Sri Lankan officials said they do not know how the bombers are linked to the terror group. During a press conference on Wednesday, Sri Lanka's minister of defense, Ruwan Wijewardene, said most of the bombers were well-educated and from families that "are stable financially." Catherine Garcia

9:25 p.m.

Now that Special Counsel Robert Mueller's redacted report has been released, some people are demanding President Trump's impeachment while others say there's no need to act, but there is a middle ground, Hillary Clinton writes in an op-ed published Wednesday night by The Washington Post.

The report's "definitive conclusion" is simple, Clinton said: the 2016 presidential election "was corrupted, our democracy assaulted, our sovereignty and security violated." History has shown a way forward from here, she said, and that involves Congress holding "substantive hearings" and the formation of an independent and bipartisan commission to "help protect our elections."



Clinton admits that the matter is "personal for me, and some might say I'm not the right messenger," but while serving as a senator and secretary of state, she saw the ascent of Russian President Vladimir Putin, and "knows firsthand that he seeks to weaken our country." Congress must take the Mueller report and use it "as a road map. It's up to members of both parties to see where that road map leads — to the eventual filing of articles of impeachment, or not."

In addition to hearings that "build on the Mueller report and fill in its gaps, not jump straight to an up-or-down vote on impeachment," a commission like the one created after the 9/11 attacks is necessary because "the president of the United States has proved himself unwilling to defend our nation from a clear and present danger," Clinton said.

She also has a message for House Democrats, reminding them that during Watergate, Congress was able to pass the Endangered Species Act, Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1973, and War Powers Act. They need to "stay focused on the sensible agenda that voters demanded in the midterms, from protecting health care to investing in infrastructure," as it's "not only possible to move forward on multiple fronts at the same time, it's essential." Read the entire op-ed at The Washington Post. Catherine Garcia

7:58 p.m.

Bridget Anne Kelly was sentenced to 13 months in federal prison on Wednesday due to her role in the New Jersey Bridgegate scandal, and while standing outside the courthouse, asked why her onetime boss, former Gov. Chris Christie (R), got off scot free.

Prosecutors accused Kelly, Christie's former deputy chief of staff, and Bill Baroni, the former deputy executive director of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, of purposely closing lanes near the George Washington Bridge in 2013 in order to cause a traffic nightmare and get back at the town's Democratic mayor for not endorsing Christie's re-election. They were found guilty in November 2016, but after a federal appeals court tossed part of the corruption case against her, Kelly had to be re-sentenced, NJ.com reports.

Kelly has long said Christie, who was never charged in the scandal, and others knew about the plan, but did not attempt to intervene. "How did all these men all escape justice?" she asked. "Chris Christie was allowed, without rebuttal from anyone, to say out of one side of his mouth that I was a low-level staffer. A woman only good enough to plan menus and invite people to events. And then say out of the other side that I was somehow powerful enough to shut down the George Washington Bridge."

Christie, she continued, is "a bully, and the days of you calling me a liar and destroying my life are over." A spokesman for the former governor told NJ.com he "had no knowledge of this scheme prior to or during these lane realignments, and had no role in authorizing them." Catherine Garcia

7:04 p.m.

The National Security Agency has recommended the White House drop the controversial phone surveillance program that was secretly launched during the George W. Bush administration following the 9/11 attacks, people familiar with the matter told The Wall Street Journal.

The program, which collects data on U.S. phone calls and text messages, was started without a court order, and its existence wasn't known until former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden leaked information to journalists about it in 2013. After saying for years that the program is a key tool in finding and thwarting terrorism plots, senior NSA officials now believe its many logistical and legal issues outweigh any intelligence benefits, the Journal reports.

Earlier this year, the NSA had to stop the program due to "frustrations about legal-compliance issues," several people told the Journal. While it is authorized by Congress, the White House ultimately decides whether to press for the program's renewal. If the White House follows the NSA's recommendation, the program's legal authority will expire in December. Catherine Garcia

6:06 p.m.

Rev. Franklin Graham is blasting 2020 candidate Pete Buttigieg again in a string of anti-gay tweets.

The pro-Trump preacher said Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana should be "repentant" for being gay instead of being "praised or politicized," he wrote in a tweet on Wednesday. Buttigieg, who is openly gay and Christian, recently said Democrats and Republicans could agree that "God does not have a political party."

"God doesn't have a political party," Graham affirmed. "But God does have commandments, laws & standards," wrote Graham on Twitter. "Mayor Buttigieg says he's a gay Christian. As a Christian I believe the Bible which defines homosexuality as sin, something to be repentant of, not something to be flaunted, praised or politicized. The Bible says marriage is between a man & a woman—not two men, not two women."

Earlier this week, Graham, the president and CEO of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association condemned anti-LGBT hecklers at the 2020 candidate's Iowa rallies, but also berated the candidate with Leviticus scriptures, which calls same-sex relationships an "abomination," reports the New York Daily News.

Graham's campaign against the 2020 hopeful comes as his church tries to demote the "success of the gay agenda." Buttigieg's campaign has not responded to Graham's outburst. Tatyana Bellamy-Walker

5:44 p.m.

A little over a month after New York Attorney General Letitia James issued subpoenas to Deutsche Bank for records tied to funding for several Trump Organization projects, the bank has started to hand over the documents, CNN reports.

The documents are reportedly related to loans made to President Trump and his company, including ones for the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C.; the Trump National Doral Miami; the Trump International Hotel and Tower in Chicago; and the unsuccessful effort to buy the NFL's Buffalo Bills. James issued the subpoenas after Trump's former attorney Michael Cohen publicly testified against the president before Congress in February, saying Trump inflated his assets to secure loans from Deutsche Bank.

Despite reported apprehension by many high-ranking officials at the bank, Trump's businesses have reportedly borrowed $300 million from Deutsche Bank to finance the projects listed above.

A spokeswoman for Deutsche Bank declined to comment on the situation, CNN reports. Tim O'Donnell

5:30 p.m.

Oh, the wonders of Silicon Valley.

Facebook said on Wednesday that it expects to face a fine of up to $5 billion from the Federal Trade Commission for allegedly violating a 2011 privacy consent decree. The New York Times reports that the total would be a record penalty for a technology company by the agency. But at the end of the day, it doesn't seem like the social media company will lose much sleep over the amount.

Facebook disclosed the fine in its quarterly financial results, estimating that it would take a one-time charge of $3 billion to $5 billion from the FTC. But even when accounting for the hit, CNBC reports Facebook still exceeded revenue expectations — the company took in $15.08 billion for the quarter and met its target for daily active user growth.

As much criticism as CEO Mark Zuckerberg and the company have faced recently for playing fast and loose with user data, the ultimate insignificance is a sobering reminder of just how much of a giant Facebook really is. Tim O'Donnell

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