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September 23, 2017

The Cleveland Cavaliers' LeBron James hit back at President Trump on Twitter Saturday morning in response to Trump's tweeted announcement that the Golden State Warriors will not be invited to the White House to celebrate their NBA championship after point guard Stephen Curry criticized Trump's policies and rhetoric. As James sees it, Curry's Friday statement that he does not want to meet Trump means the president had no invitation to rescind:

James, who is vice president of the NBA Players Association, was not the only pro athlete to take issue with Trump's weekend critiques of Curry and Colin Kaepernick, the latter of whom Trump referred to as a "son of a bitch" for his habit of declining to stand for the national anthem to protest police brutality and racial injustice in America.

Roger Goodell, the NFL commissioner, also pushed back on Trump's remarks, calling Trump's comments "divisive" and demonstrative of "an unfortunate lack of respect for the NFL." Bonnie Kristian

July 9, 2015

It all began when Jeb Bush surprised audiences Wednesday by saying that "people need to work longer hours" in order for the economy to grow, The Washington Post reports. The comment came during Bush's meeting with the editorial board of the New Hampshire Union Leader and was quickly tackled by the Democratic National Committee, who called his remark "easily one of the most out-of-touch comments we’ve heard so far this cycle." They weren't the only ones to think so:

But Bush wasn't to be without the last word. His response came early this morning, tweeted back at Clinton:

Look at that sass! Who'd have thought Jeb had it in him?

Bush additionally clarified in a town hall meeting Wednesday that his comments about people needing to work longer hours were in reference only to people working part time, CNN reports. "You can take it out of context all you want, but high sustained growth means people work 40 hours rather than 30 hours and that by our success they have disposable income for their families to decide how they want to spend it rather than standing in line and being dependent upon government," Bush said. Jeva Lange