the next step
November 21, 2019

Republicans are getting ready to pull the impeachment ball back into their court.

Within minutes of Thursday's impeachment hearings closing out two weeks of testimony before the House Intelligence Committee, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), who runs the Senate Judiciary Committee, sent Secretary of State Mike Pompeo a letter. In it, Graham requested a bevvy of documents from the Obama administration, including any that involved Hunter Biden, former Vice President Joe Biden, and former Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko.

Hunter Biden's work on the board of the Ukrainian company Burisma indirectly led to this whole impeachment inquiry, as the company was at one time under investigation by Ukraine's prosecutor general Viktor Shokin and Joe Biden later pushed Poroshenko for Shokin's firing. Graham spells this out in his letter, saying that he'd like to "answer questions regarding allegations" that Biden got Shokin fired to "end the investigation" into Burisma. So he's seeking "documents and communications" between Joe Biden and Poroshenko from the days they presumably talked about Shokin — widely viewed as corrupt and ineffective — as well as any documents from a meeting between a business partner of Hunter Biden's and former Secretary of State John Kerry.

Graham's move directly contradicts what he told CNN's Manu Raju a few weeks ago: that investigating Hunter Biden wasn't within his committee's jurisdiction. So what's changed this time around? Well, House Intelligence Committee Chair Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) just wrapped up impeachment hearings with what sounded like an endorsement of proceeding to the final step in the impeachment process: a trial in the Senate. Kathryn Krawczyk

July 3, 2018

Twelve Thai youth soccer team members trapped in a cave for more than a week have been found alive, but the boys and their coach could remain stuck for months before flooding recedes enough for them to be freed, Sky News reports.

The team became trapped on June 23 when flash floods hit while they were exploring the massive cave system; the group managed to survive by crowding onto a narrow ledge as the waters rose. The Thai military is considering sending at least four months worth of food to the team. The alternative is teaching the boys how to dive, but that poses its own risks. It took a group of cave diving experts days to reach the team, and many of the trapped boys are believed to not know how to swim, Axios reports.

"Although water levels have dropped, the diving conditions remain difficult and any attempt to dive the boys and their coach out will not be taken lightly because there are significant technical challenges and risks to consider," said the British Cave Rescue Council, which is assisting in the rescue. Jeva Lange

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