×
women's march
November 19, 2018

The founder of the Women's March is joining growing calls for its current leaders to step down.

After Teresa Shook's plan for a march against President Trump took off, she handed the reins over to a group of activists. But in a Monday statement, Shook said those new leaders had "steered the movement away from its true course" because they "have allowed anti-Semitism, anti-LBGTQIA sentiment and hateful, racist rhetoric to become a part of the platform."

After Shook launched the idea for a Women's March, activists Bob Bland, Tamika Mallory, Carmen Perez, and Linda Sarsour stepped up to organize it. Millions of people around the world marched the day after President Trump's inauguration, inspiring follow-up marches of the same nature.

Months later, criticism began to arise over Mallory, Perez, and Sarsour's ties to Louis Farrakhan, the Nation of Islam leader who has repeatedly made anti-Semitic comments. They've since come short of condemning Farrakhan, prompting conservative calls to boycott future Women's March events. Sarsour has received most of the derision for the Farrakhan ties, as well as other controversial comments.

All of these moves are "in opposition" to the Women's March's principles, Shook said in her Monday statement. So in an effort to bring the movement back to its roots, Shook called for "the current co-chairs to step down" and for leaders who can "restore" the march's "original intent" to step forward. Kathryn Krawczyk

January 20, 2018

The Women's March returned for a second year Saturday as tens of thousands of women rallied in cities across the country, including Washington, New York, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, and more.

The march in Washington proceeded despite the government shutdown, which many demonstrators referenced as part of their critique of the Trump administration. Immigration policy, the #MeToo movement, health care, and the 2018 midterm elections were of central concern to many participants. One protest sign in Washington referenced President Trump's notorious Access Hollywood comments, urging demonstrators to "Grab him by the midterms."

"I'm done with men feeling like they have some sort of power over women," Amanda Kowalski, a protester in Los Angeles, told The New York Times, "and I'm definitely done with having a president who believes that he has the power to take things from them, to take things that are provided — like Planned Parenthood — from women, when they deserve the same sort of health care as anybody else."

See scenes from demonstrations in several cities below. Bonnie Kristian

January 22, 2017

President Trump responded Sunday morning to the hundreds of Women's Marches held Saturday in cities across the country and around the globe to protest his election. He began by suggesting the protesters should have simply voted against him and then accepted the election results.

An hour and a half later, Trump added a second post with a more conciliatory tone:

Interspersed between those two tweets, Trump said he had a "great meeting at CIA Headquarters" Saturday with "long standing ovations" and noted that his inauguration drew 11 million more television viewers than President Obama's 2013 event. Trump did not mention that Obama's 2009 viewership outpaced his own. Bonnie Kristian

January 22, 2017

Official estimates of the crowds at Women's Marches criticizing the Trump administration nationwide on Saturday put the events' attendance at about 1.6 million collectively, CNN reports, with around 600,000 people in Washington, D.C., alone.

March organizers' estimates are higher, reporting about 5 million protesters across the United States, including 750,000 in Los Angeles, where the police assessment is just 100,000 marchers. Unknown thousands also marched in more than 20 countries abroad; all told, some 670 marches were organized on all seven continents.

By any tally, the march in Washington far exceeded initial projections of 200,000 attendees. The protesters may well have outnumbered inauguration attendees, too: The D.C. Metro system reported it saw more riders by 11 a.m. on Saturday than on the day of the inauguration: 275,000 rides Saturday compared to 193,000 by the same time Friday. Bonnie Kristian

January 21, 2017

Actress Ashley Judd took the stage at the Women's March on Washington following filmmaker Michael Moore on Saturday, and she shared a beat poem by 19-year-old Tennessean Nina Donovan titled "I am a nasty woman." Repeatedly referencing President Trump's insult for then-rival Hillary Clinton during the final presidential debate, the poem's author says she is a nasty woman — but "not as nasty as a man who looks like he bathes in Cheeto dust, a man whose words are a dis to America, Electoral College-sanctioned hate speech."

"I didn't know devils could be resurrected, but I feel Hitler in these streets," Judd continued. "A moustache traded for a toupee, Nazis renamed." Watch her full performance below. Bonnie Kristian

January 21, 2017

After a busy day of inaugural festivities Friday, President Trump's campaign rival, Hillary Clinton, did not attend the Women's March on Washington on Saturday — but she did tweet her support for the event.

The protest of the new Donald Trump administration on Saturday featured remarks from speakers including America Ferrera, Angela Davis, Gloria Steinem, Scarlett Johansson, Melissa Harris-Perry, and more.

An estimated 500,000 protesters converged on Washington for the Women's March; the crowd at Trump's inauguration the day before was projected to be 800,000 to 900,000 people. Both crowd tallies remain unofficial appraisals at this stage. Bonnie Kristian

January 21, 2017

"We march today for our families and our neighbors, for our future, for the causes that we claim and the causes that claim us," said actress America Ferrera on Saturday at the Women's March on Washington. "We march today for the moral core of this nation, against which our new president is waging a war."

"He would like us to forget the words, 'Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,' and instead take up a credo of hate, fear, and suspicion of one another," she continued, "but we are gathered here and across the country and around the world today to say, 'Mr. Trump, we refuse!'"

Originally expected to be attended by about 200,000 women, Washington officials now say the Women's March organizers estimate their numbers at half a million strong. Watch Ferrera's full speech below. Bonnie Kristian

January 21, 2017

About 200,000 women are expected to descend on the capital on Saturday for the Women's March on Washington, an organized protest of the new Donald Trump administration anticipated to contrast both with Trump's inauguration Friday and the smaller and occasionally violent protests that attended it.

"The Women's March on Washington will send a bold message to our new government on their first day in office, and to the world that women's rights are human rights," says the march website, which includes a mission statement as well as guiding principles for the event. "We stand together, recognizing that defending the most marginalized among us is defending all of us."

Initially suggested by a grandmother from Hawaii, the march has ballooned into a national movement with celebrity support and sister marches scheduled Saturday in state capitals around the country. See some early photos of the gathering protesters below. Bonnie Kristian

See More Speed Reads